Welcome to the website of "Your Heroes" group on flickr. ALL PHOTOS posted on this site are protected by copyright laws. Please do not copy or reproduce any photo without the approval of its owner. You can read the entire description of each photo by clicking the name of the photo owner below the photograph. --Princess Maleiha B. Candao (Blog Administrator)

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Jahangir Khan is the first Photojournalist from Pakistan to going Japan for six month training by Jahangir@ Tokyo.


Jahangir Khan is the first Photojournalist from Pakistan to going Japan for six month training.
Originally uploaded by Jahangir @ tokyo

25515 Und dann fand da noch by golli43


25515 Und dann fand da noch
Originally uploaded by golli43

UNHCR News Story: UNHCR emergency training goes regional with new programme in South America by UNHCR


UNHCR News Story: UNHCR emergency training goes regional with new programme in South America
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

UN High Commissioner for Refugees: From van Heuven Goedhart to Guterres by UNHCR


UN High Commissioner for Refugees: From van Heuven Goedhart to Guterres
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

Valentino Achak Deng by UNHCR


Valentino Achak Deng
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

UN High Commissioner for Refugees: From van Heuven Goedhart to Guterres by UNHCR


UN High Commissioner for Refugees: From van Heuven Goedhart to Guterres
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

UNHCR News Story: Asian civil society mobilizes in support of refugee rights by UNHCR


UNHCR News Story: Asian civil society mobilizes in support of refugee rights
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

UN High Commissioner for Refugees: From van Heuven Goedhart to Guterres by UNHCR


UN High Commissioner for Refugees: From van Heuven Goedhart to Guterres
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Saturday, May 2, 2009

Sojourner/Sojourner


Sojourner/Sojourner
Originally uploaded by bobster1985

Sojourner Truth (1797–November 26, 1883) was the self-given name, from 1843, of Isabella Baumfree, an American slave, abolitionist and women's rights activist. Truth was born into slavery in Swartekill, New York. Her best-known speech, Ain't I a Woman?, was delivered in 1851 at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. (Wikipedia)

Please read more at bobster' 1985's flickr page.

Saturday, April 25, 2009

Sunday, April 19, 2009

•.¸♥ ¸.•Mem♥ries: M♥m & I•.¸♥ ¸.•


•.¸♥ ¸.•Mem♥ries: M♥m & I•.¸♥ ¸.•
Originally uploaded by Princess Activist

My mother was my hero. She will always be in my heart for she and dad were responsible for what I am now. Their love and support brought out the best in me.

Saturday, April 18, 2009

Hero


Hero
Originally uploaded by ZAK!


Description and Photo by ZAK (please see the link above).

In a rare show of political maturity, Samad Khurram, a student of a private school in Islamabad refused to accept his an award of academic excellence from the American Ambassador Anne W. Patterson. The academic excellence award was being given to him for his admission to Harvard, a world distinction in thinking skills, a regional distinction in chemistry and 7 A grades in A level. The student said that he did so because of the United States attacks on the tribal regions of Pakistan in which innocent children and the people are dying, and the US continuous support for the dictator Pervez Musharraf.

The face of Anne W. Patterson turned red and for 5 long seconds she stood there motionless with shame and anger. When the student was called to receive the certificate on the stage from the US ambassador, he just passed her and went to dice and cited the reason. As he passed the American ambassador, the principal also became flabbergasted, she tried to take hold of the student by the sleeve, but he moved on, while the American diplomat watched in horror and embarrassment.

Then American ambassador in his speech tried to brush the incident away by adopting a pedantic tone and tried to make the matter light. The principle never recovered from the shock, as she knew what’s waiting for her in the store after the function. Not only the chance of hefty donation from the Americans went down the drain, but also it will surely cost her the job.

That’s is the collateral damage of the war on terror.

Friday, April 17, 2009

♥ Face of Poverty


♥ Face of Poverty
Originally uploaded by Princess Activist

I found this photo in my yahoo group. You can see the innocent eyes of a child who is struggling in the face of poverty. His hands are overworked and his mind is imprisoned by the need to work to help his parents meet their basic needs for survival.

Internally displaced in Bogota


Internally displaced in Bogota
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

Remote Dolo Ado becomes a safe haven for 10,000 Somalis fleeing violence


Remote Dolo Ado becomes a safe haven for 10,000 Somalis fleeing violence
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

Remote Dolo Ado becomes a safe haven for 10,000 Somalis fleeing violence


Remote Dolo Ado becomes a safe haven for 10,000 Somalis fleeing violence
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

UNHCR News Story: UNHCR staff celebrate release of John Solecki, mourn slain colleague


UNHCR News Story: UNHCR staff celebrate release of John Solecki, mourn slain colleague
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

UNHCR News Story: Young Burundians reunite with their families after years of separation


UNHCR News Story: Young Burundians reunite with their families after years of separation
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

Benin: Influx from Togo


Benin: Influx from Togo
Originally uploaded by UNHCR

Togolese refugees dig trenches around their tents at Lokossa camp to prevent flooding during seasonal rains. ©UNHCR/J.Björgvinsson/May 2005.

Sunday, April 12, 2009

The Love Story


The Love Story
Originally uploaded by Princess Activist
(Source: Wikipedia)

Love Story is a 1970 romantic drama film written by Erich Segal based on his 1970 best-selling novel. It was directed by Arthur Hiller.

The film, well-known as a tear-jerking tragedy, is considered one of the most romantic of all time by the American Film Institute (#9 on the list), and was followed by a sequel, Oliver's Story in 1978.

Love Story starred actor Ryan O'Neal and actress Ali MacGraw and also marked the film debut of Tommy Lee Jones in a minor role.

Plot

The novel tells of Oliver Barrett IV, who comes from a family of wealthy and well-respected Harvard University graduates. Partly to break the traditional Ivy League mold, the Harvard student meets and falls in love with Jennifer Cavelleri, a working-class, quick-witted Radcliffe College student.

Upon graduation from college, the two decide to marry against the wishes of Oliver's father, who thereupon severs ties with his son.

Without his father's financial support, the couple struggles to pay Oliver's way through Harvard Law School with Jenny working as a private school teacher. Graduating third in his class, Oliver takes a position at a respectable New York law firm.

With Oliver's new income, the pair of 24-year-olds decide to have a child. After failing, they consult a medical specialist, who after repeated tests, informs Oliver that Jenny is ill and will soon die. Oliver then tries again. While this is not stated explicitly, she appears to have leukemia.

As instructed by his doctor, Oliver attempts to live a "normal life" without telling Jenny of her condition. Jenny nevertheless discovers her ailment after confronting her doctor about her recent illness. With their days together numbered, Jenny begins costly cancer therapy, and Oliver soon becomes unable to afford the multiplying hospital expenses.

Desperate, he seeks financial relief from his father. Instead of telling his father what the money is truly for, Oliver misleads him.

From her hospital bed, Jenny speaks with her father about funeral arrangements, and then asks for Oliver. She tells him to avoid blaming himself, and asks him to embrace her tightly before she dies.

The novel also includes the double meaning of a love story between Oliver and his father, highlighted by the scene between Oliver and his father at the end of the book. When Mr. Barrett realizes that Jenny is ill and that his son borrowed the money for her, he immediately sets out for New York. By the time he reaches the hospital, Jenny is dead. Mr. Barrett apologizes to his son, who replies with something Jenny once told him: "Love means never having to say you're sorry."

REVIEW:

This is one of my favorite love story movies which I really love to watch whenever I have the time inside the privacy of my room. I do not find it boring nor monotonous, what I find instead is the ability of the heart to be selfless when believing in the greatness of human emotions, whether rewarding or the opposite.

Emotions coming from selflessness means the need to believe in the betterment of the beloved for only through self-sacrifice can one really find the authentic essence of loving someone and being loved in return.

Saturday, April 11, 2009

farmer


farmer
Originally uploaded by willinggabor

A great woman, 1898


A great woman, 1898
Originally uploaded by bobster1985
Photo of Eleanor Roosevelt, from the National Archives.

FDR says America must help Great Britain - 1940 film

This is an excerpt from Franklin D. Roosevelt's famous 'Arsenal of Democracy' speech, in which he explains why aiding Great Britain against Nazi Germany is so important to America's security.

I was born 10 years after FDR's death, so I have no memory of him, but through reading and watching films such as this I've come to believe that he was easily the greatest U.S. President of the 20th Century, with only Washington and Lincoln rivaling him in importance. He restored the nation's hope in its worst economic crisis ever, putting millions to work through government programs that did great things for this country. He helped keep Britain free by persuading a reluctant nation to support Lend-Lease programs. And as commander-in-chief, he successfully led America through a great war in Europe and the Pacific. The only man to serve more than two terms as president, FDR was a giant.

Jacques Brel


Jacques Brel
Originally uploaded by B.Mahmoud

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Moulton-Barrett was born March 6, 1806, in Coxhoe Hall, Durham, England. In 1809, her father Edward, having made most of his considerable fortune from Jamaican sugar plantations which he inherited, bought "Hope End", a 500-acre (2.0 km2) estate near the Malvern Hills in Ledbury, Herefordshire, England. Elizabeth was the eldest of Edward and his wife Mary Graham-Clarke, who had 12 children. Elizabeth was educated at home, attending lessons with her brother's tutor and was consequently well educated for a girl of that time.

Her first poem on record is from the age of six or eight. The manuscript is currently in the Berg Collection of the New York Public Library, but the exact date is doubtful because the "2" in the date 1812 is written over something else that is scratched out. A long Homeric poem titled The Battle of Marathon was published when she was fourteen, her father paying for its publication. Barrett later referred to her first literary attempt as, "Pope's Homer done over again, or rather undone."

During her teen years, she read the principal Greek and Latin authors and Dante's Inferno in their original languages. Her appetite for knowledge led her to learn Hebrew and read the Old Testament from beginning to end. By the age of twelve, she had written an "epic" poem consisting of four books of rhyming couplets.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Suzanna Arundhati Roy

Suzanna Arundhati Roy (born 24 November 1961) is an Indian writer and activist who won the Booker Prize in 1997 for her novel, The God of Small Things, and in 2002, the Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize.

Roy was born in Shillong, Meghalaya,India, to a Keralite Syrian Christian mother, the women's rights activist Mary Roy, and a Bengali father, a tea planter by profession. She spent her childhood in Aymanam in Kerala, and went to school at Corpus Christi, Kottayam, followed by the Lawrence School, Lovedale, in Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu. She then studied architecture at the School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi, where she met her first husband, architect Gerard da Cunha.

Roy met her second husband, filmmaker Pradip Krishen, in 1984, and played a village girl in his award-winning movie Massey Sahib. Until made financially stable by the success of her novel The God of Small Things, she worked various jobs, including running aerobics classes at New Delhi five-star hotels. Roy is a niece of prominent media personality Prannoy Roy, the head of the leading Indian TV media group NDTV, and lives in New Delhi.

Works
Early in her career, Roy worked for television and movies. She wrote the screenplays for In Which Annie Gives It Those Ones (1989), a movie based on her experiences as a student of architecture, directed by her current husband, and Electric Moon (1992); in both she also appeared as a performer. Roy attracted attention when she criticised Shekhar Kapur's film Bandit Queen, based on the life of Phoolan Devi, charging Kapur with exploiting Devi and misrepresenting both her life and its meaning.

Roy began writing her first novel, The God of Small Things, in 1992, completing it in 1996. The book is semi-autobiographical and a major part captures her childhood experiences in Ayemenem or Aymanam.

The book received the 1997 Booker Prize for Fiction and was listed as one of the New York Times Notable Books of the Year for 1997.It reached fourth position on the New York Times Bestsellers list for Independent Fiction. From the beginning, the book was also a commercial success: Roy received half a million pounds as an advance, and rights to the book were sold in 21 countries.

The God of Small Things received good reviews, for instance in The New York Times.

After the success of her novel, Roy has been working as a screenplay writer again, writing a television serial, The Banyan Tree,and the documentary DAM/AGE: A Film with Arundhati Roy (2002).

In early 2007, Roy announced that she would begin work on a second novel.

Activism and advocacy
Since The God of Small Things Roy has devoted herself mainly to nonfiction and politics, publishing two more collections of essays, as well as working for social causes. She is a spokesperson of the anti-globalization/alter-globalization movement and a vehement critic of neo-imperialism and of the global policies of the United States. She also criticizes India's nuclear weapons policies and the approach to industrialization and rapid development as currently being practiced in India, including the Narmada Dam project and the power company Enron's activities in India.

(Source: Wikipedia)

About YOUR HEROES

It is time to have a group in flickr that acknowledges the greatness of man, whoever that man is, whether that person is a she or a he. What is important is that you perceive that person to be YOUR HERO.

YOUR HERO can be your neighbor next door who went out of their way when you and your family needed help the most. He or she can be the teacher in your school, your officemate, friend or a kin.

YOUR HERO can also be your family members, government leaders, writers, journalists and more.

YOUR HERO can also be yourself.

Share photos that speak of "heroism" done at any given moment in your life or in the lives of the people known to you.

You can also post the portraits and biographies of your heroes too.

This is the group that will acknowledge them for whatever positive things they have contributed to your community or to the world.